7 posts / 0 new
Last post
Anf
Anf's picture
Tornado kick practicality

Hi all. I struggle with the Tornado kick / jumping 360 roundhouse kick. It looks awesome when done well. And I have no doubt it generates huge power. But it consumes a lot of energy, and is slow. It's quite easy to just get out the way when you see it being set up. So I'm wondering if anyone can think of a scenario where it is actually practical. The only thing I can think of is as a training tool. It calls for a fair amount of coordination and timing, and these attributes are of course core to martial arts. But aside from developing that coordination, is there ever a situation where the technique is practical in and of itself?

Chris R
Chris R's picture

People have been knocked out by tornado kicks in combat sports, however it is used very rarely and is not a necessary technique to learn. That's the only situation I can think of where it could be used, other than just for fun.

Quick2Kick
Quick2Kick's picture

When you know and practice what I know and practice a complicated fake can be useful. A tornado kick is a fake spinning kick.

Iain Abernethy
Iain Abernethy's picture

Anf wrote:
I struggle with the Tornado kick / jumping 360 roundhouse kick.

It’s not one I personally struggle with … because I never practise it :-) If I were too, then I’m certain I would.  

Anf wrote:
It calls for a fair amount of coordination and timing, and these attributes are of course core to martial arts.

For those so included, the achievement of being able to do something so complex would be satisfying. There’s a satisfaction in learning any skill that should not be overlooked. As part of my daily stretching I include a few “yoga poses”. I do a mean Raven and a variety of headstands … and while I’m never going to do those in a fight, the process of learning the physical control to do them well was satisfying, and I’m sure the physical control and balance has some indirect benefits. Same with this kick.

Anf wrote:
But aside from developing that coordination, is there ever a situation where the technique is practical in and of itself?

I can’t think of any. I once saw a guy score a full point with one in WKF style competition (back in the days where it was three ippons to win), but I’ve seen far more points scored with far simpler techniques. As for self-protection, we can forget it entirely. Kicking itself is risky enough.

Fun and satisfaction are good reasons to do something. There’s no practical use for this kick though.

All the best,

Iain

Cataphract
Cataphract's picture

In kata,strikes to the hand with the instep are invariably preceded by a 180° turn, aren't they? (Heian godan, Bassai Dai, Unsu) I think one could interpret those as something similar to tornado. I've seen Kung Fu people doing these (turning jump, crescent kick) in two man forms against attacks from behind at very close range.

Marc
Marc's picture

Cataphract wrote:
In kata,strikes to the hand with the instep are invariably preceded by a 180° turn, aren't they? (Heian godan, Bassai Dai, Unsu)

Sometimes they are (e.g. Hangetsu), sometimes they are just turning the head by 180° without moving the feet (e.g. Bassai-Dai, Heian-Godan, Sochin), and sometimes they are not (e.g. Meikyo).

Cataphract wrote:
I think one could interpret those as something similar to tornado. I've seen Kung Fu people doing these (turning jump, crescent kick) in two man forms against attacks from behind at very close range.

While I'm sure those are fun to watch or do, I'd rather think of Mikazuki-Geri as a kick to and through the opponent's leg. Forum member Les shows it well in one of his videos:

Iain Abernethy
Iain Abernethy's picture

Marc wrote:
I'd rather think of Mikazuki-Geri as a kick to and through the opponent's leg.

Me too. It’s simple and it works. Les’s video show shows some great examples.

Here is my take on the kick as it appears at the end of Hangetsu / Seishan.

All the best,

Iain