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Tau
Tau's picture
Juji Gatame

Iain teaches this as a standalone technique and also as part of Empi bunkai. We covered it this past weekend and I received an e-mail thanking me for my help in understanding this technique. So I thought to create a video for others to benefit from:

Iain Abernethy
Iain Abernethy's picture

Tau wrote:
Iain teaches this as a standalone technique and also as part of Empi bunkai

To clarify, it is one of the “fighting techniques” we teach in my dojo, and it is possible to link it to Enpi / Wanshu bunkai … but I don’t actually formally teach it as Wanshu bunkai in my dojo. Part of the reason being that Wanshu is an optional kata for 3rd dans and above and hence we have no set drills for the kata because at that level people are expected to create such drills as proof they are ready to advance. We also want people to learn the technique long before 3rd dan :-) It’s taught in the kyu grades from both top and bottom and the primary source for all that comes from judo (a significant proportion of our senior grades have also studied judo).

All the best,

Iain

Dale Parker
Dale Parker's picture

Specifically Ude-Hishigi-Juji-Gatame 腕挫十字固.  Because there are other Juji-Gatame that are not this technique.

Nice video.

Wastelander
Wastelander's picture

Juji-gatame is a great technique, when used appropriately! I learned it in judo, as well, and it's my highest-percentage submission in grappling--honestly, I need to go for it less often :P.

Tau
Tau's picture

There is a certain satisfaction to gaining a submission with Juji, isn't there? It's probably most people's favourite.

Dale Parker
Dale Parker's picture

Evidently most people are not aware there is a counter to it.

mike23
mike23's picture

"a"? you mean "counters"

:-)

Tau
Tau's picture

And indeed counters to counters.

I emphasise that this was an introduction, intended for those not familiar with the lock. I could have gone into greater depth, greater technique refinement and more entries and from more diverse positions.

I'm finding that actually this lock is getting used less because the counters are so well known. That said, it's a great lock to study because the principles are of it are well transferred.

mike23
mike23's picture

I agree. when the opponent is still strong they can resist for quite a while.Also from the top position you have to leave the strong mount position to achieve the arm bar and if you don't succeed you are in a bad position.

Iain Abernethy
Iain Abernethy's picture

One of the most interesting Judo lessons I have had was where my coach took us through the “original” technique as performed by Kano through the full development to how it is used today. We did all versions, as he discussed the counter used and who developed it, how the counter to the counter was developed and who developed that, and so on. It was interesting to see the “arms race” through the decades as the lock evolved through Judo competition.

In a judo context, we regularly practised moving to a hold down from a “sitting pre-juji postion” should your opponent be able to kill the attempt to straighten the arm. Not good for other environments, but the failure to get the lock can still leave you in a strong position within a judo context.

Juji-gatame is very much a “fighting technique” as opposed to a “self-protection technique” I feel.

All the best,

Iain

Tau
Tau's picture

Iain Abernethy wrote:
Juji-gatame is very much a “fighting technique” as opposed to a “self-protection technique” I feel.

Replace your Sangaku Jime with Juji Gatame and the photo' remains completely accurate (no point creating another photo'!)

 

Granted it's not practical, but it's hellish fun and satisfying to pull off in class.

 

Iain Abernethy wrote:
One of the most interesting Judo lessons I have had was where my coach took us through the “original” technique as performed by Kano through the full development to how it is used today. We did all versions, as he discussed the counter used and who developed it, how the counter to the counter was developed and who developed that, and so on. It was interesting to see the “arms race” through the decades as the lock evolved through Judo competition.

That would be fascinating. Along the same lines, Kesa Gatame is becoming popular (in BJJ again.) My understanding is that it was so widely practiced that everyone* learned the counter so it became pointless to learn. Because no-one* learns it, no-one* has the counter anyway. And so it's become effective again.

* Accepted that "no-one" / "everyone" is of course an exageration.

sarflondonboydo...
sarflondonboydonewell's picture

hanks for posting the video;  the 2 coaching tips I always give when teaching this (I agree with Ian good fighting technique but not a good personal protection technique).  

  1. Ensure the opponents thumb is pointed upwards when brings the joint into the lock position (thumbs up!!)
  2. Squeeze the legs together at the knees to keep the arm straight and allow less wriggle room for the arm(some say this also can prevent some counters but I have an open mind on that).

The ‘classic’ way is to have the left leg over the neck and the right leg bent with the foot under the opponents body to prevent him rolling into you( giving one I think slightly more pressure when squeezing the legs together) However I think most people who teach it do the modern style with both legs over as per the video or pillow and or sangaku

I recommend the great Neil Adams book ‘armlocks’ by Ippon in the Judo Masterclass series.

Tau
Tau's picture

sarflondonboydonewell wrote:
I recommend the great Neil Adams book ‘armlocks’ by Ippon in the Judo Masterclass series.

So do I. The only caveat is that that book is now years old and the technique has been refined lots since and indeed needs to be applied differently for different contexts. Whereas Judo is now limiting time available to secure submissions, for non-Judo there is often the time allowed to find different ways into it and to use it as part of the "chess game."

I completely agree with your coaching points. This video was deliberately kept simple for those training with Iain that aren't routinely practicing grappling arts and aren't familiar with the lock. I certainly wouldn't have put it on YouTube otherwise as there are MANY videos on it going into much greater depth that I have, and taught by much greater grapplers than I (not difficult!)