Kata Application

This forum is dedicated to an exchange of ideas relating to the practical application of Okinawan and Japanese kata. Increase
your understanding of kata whilst helping others to do the same.

Dillon's picture

Heian nidan/Pinan shodan/Pinan sono ni

I was going through old files on my computer and found a couple short clips I filmed for a friend playing with some bunkai for this kata. Figured I'd throw them up here :) These were filmed without planning or rehearsal at the end of a long class, so please excuse the poor quality.

 

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Wastelander's picture

Pinan Yondan Opening Sequence

This week's Waza Wednesday video covers an application for the opening movement of Pinan Yondan, as well as two follow-up applications from the next sequence, which is the sasae-gedan-barai (supported low sweep), or gedan-juji-uke (low crossed receiver/block). The first application is a straight arm lock, which we demonstrate against a punch, but can be used any time the opponent extends their arm and you are on the inside.

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Mark B's picture

A selection of Seisan Bunkai Oyo

The various Seisan kata are my particular field of study, so here's a small selection of applications,  each emphasises the principle of ballistic techniques at extreme close quarters.

Application from Uechi Seisan

Seisan Bunkai

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Wastelander's picture

Nunchaku Disarming Technique

My Sensei often feels like kobudo kata don't get as much attention as karate kata when it comes to bunkai. Nunchaku, specifically, seems to be misunderstood quite often, so he wanted to share a disarming technique with them that comes from the kata, Tonaki no Nunchaku. I'm not really a "weapons guy," myself, but it seems to be a fairly rare kata. Even so, the technique works whether you know the kata or not. As with most kata applications, how the opponent attacks you isn't really that important.

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Mark B's picture

Seisan Bunkai

Hi all,

Here's a quick application from Seisan. 

Again there are many key lessons hidden inside the obvious application. I personally think these are more important than the application sequence itself.

Seisan Bunkai Oyho:

Regards

Mark

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Mark B's picture

An application from Passai

Hi all,

Here's a quick application from Passai that I recorded a while ago.

Apart from the obvious sequence covered I think it's important to recognise the "lessons" within that the application teaches - moving inside the effective range, controlling the opponents head, seizing vulnerable and potentially fight ending targets, regaining lost initiative,  joint attacks, takedowns and escape.

Lots of useful strategies and principles all within one short sequence

Passai Bunkai:

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Wastelander's picture

Passai Sho/Bassai Dai Application

This Waza Wednesday looks at the sequence of tetsui-uke (hammerfist receiver), mae-geri (front kick), and three sasae-gedan-barai (supported low sweeps) near the end of Passai Sho and Bassai Dai. We demonstrate against a punch, but any time you make cross-body arm contact, you can apply this technique. Ideally, the initial limb destruction will end the fight. If it doesn't, the following shoulder lock can be employed.

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Wallace Smedley's picture

The Southern Chinese Martial Arts Opening Salute

Here is a vid I posted on my Youtube channel about the application of the opening salute in the Southern Chinese Martial Arts. Let me know what you think.

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css1971's picture

Another on embusen - the embusen rule

The embusen rule is basically that a kata should "balance". Each step in one direction should be countered by a step in the opposite direction. If they did the design of the kata right, you should always end up exactly back at the point you started. The kiten. It's good for performance of kata because you can run through a load of them without really moving, and in a small space, with a group of people. The limit to steps in any direction in okinawan kata is usually 3, giving approximately a  3mx3m (3yard x 3yard) training space.

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steveablack's picture

Kiai Points in Kata

Hi Iain

I do enjoy your Bunkai, so thank you very much.

Thoughts on the Kiai points in Kata?

As we are lead to believe, they represent a finishing technique, expelling all of one's power at the point of impact/finishing. Q1: Why are they're generally only 2 Kiai points in most Kata (Wankan an exception in Shotokan) and with a majority of your Bunkai leaving the assailant somewhat 'disorientated'; Q2: why the need for them anyway? 

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