Martial Arts

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A forum covering all things martial for all martial artists. Regardless of your chosen style, or whether you&rsquo;re a practitioner of a modern or classical system, in this forum we can all swap ideas and knowledge and help each other along our chosen paths.</p>

Wastelander's picture

Kote Kitae Drills

Today's Waza Wednesday video features a very popular arm conditioning drill, and an alternative that introduces footwork into the drill. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Wpo4UT8hoo

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Wastelander's picture

Armlock Flow Drill

This week's Waza Wednesday video covers an armlock flow drill that we teach to help students learn to transition from one technique to another as the opponent resists. It starts with an armbar, then transitions to a shoulder lock, then to a straight-arm lock, and finally a throw. All of these techniques come straight from kata. Strikes can be added, and other techniques can be included, as well.

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OnlySeisan's picture

Why is the Do suffix still used by practical minded karate practioners?

This is something I really don't understand. To my understanding from reading Karate-do Kyohan, and various books on Zen, Do or Dao has religious conatations. The Do marking the distinctions between inner development (Do) and practical technique (jutsu).

To me, it's like an atheist carrying around a bottle of holy water.

Any thoughts?

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genkaimade's picture

How extended is your arm when you punch?

Hi all, A technical question for you all today : when you hit things, how extended does your arm tend to be at the moment of impact ? Or in other words, how extended should your arm be when you make contact, in order to deliver the strike with optimum power? In bare-knuckle drills etc. I find that things tend to take care of themselves on this front. However, as soon as gloves are involved or I am working a heavy bag or equivalent, I find myself having to consciously question this point as it never quite feels right, so thought I would ask. Thank you! Alex

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Iain Abernethy's picture

Study finds no evidence for martial arts promoting self-esteem, self-confidence, etc in children

I’ve not seen this previously, but here is a link to a 2009 study on “Martial arts as a mental health intervention for children.”

http://www.capmh.com/content/pdf/1753-2000-3-32.pdf

I’ve copied the summary below and drew out some parts I found important.

The conclusion is that, on average, there is no evidence to support the idea that martial arts practise will promote mental health outcomes such as self-esteem, self-confidence, concentration, and self-discipline in children.

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Wastelander's picture

Armbar and Counter Drill

This week's video takes a quick look at a drill we do to work standing armbars, escaping standing armbars, and countering them with standing armbars. It is a very simple lock flow drill, which can be used as a platform drill to launch a variety of other techniques, and it can also be used to connect to other platform drills. It doesn't really matter how you initiate the drill--you can either just grab someone and put them in a standing armbar, or you can have them punch, grab, or push.

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Wastelander's picture

Block-Scoop-Check Drill

This week's video is, like last week's, a very popular karate drill that also functions as a platform drill. The formal version is often used as kote kitae (forearm forging), but it's really quite versatile if you look at it a bit more openly.

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genkaimade's picture

Grabbing/limb control and combat sports

Dear all,

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Wastelander's picture

Parry-Pass-Check Platform Drill

This week's Waza Wednesday video is short and sweet, but it covers a very good drill that is popular not just in karate, but in many other martial arts, as well. In our dojo, we call it a "key block" drill, but it is more commonly known as a "parry-pass" drill. The drill is relatively simple, but works well for developing timing, reaction, deflection, and limb control. It also serves as a "platform drill," from which many other techniques can be initiated. We show two examples in this video, but the possibilities are endless!

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css1971's picture

Why are kihon techniques considered important? Do you?

This has been bugging me for a long time, basically since I found I couldn't use any of the uke techniques as advertised. Partly from my Shotokan days, but the shito-ryu clubs I trained at also made use of exactly the same kihon techniques, obviously in a more constrained style. Someone, somewhere has at some point come up with a list of techniques pulled from the katas and turned them into "basics". Why these techniques? and did they have any experience of how you use them? I have a feeling they didn't.

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