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Tau
Tau's picture
-Kan -Kai -Ryu

Can anyone please explain the difference between -kan (as in Shotokan,) -ryu (as is Goju Ryu) and -kai (as in Shukukai.) I have named my school the Kajuen Ryu and spent a lot of time checking Kajuen was the correct word. I now worry that I didn't check Ryu as well as I should.

JWT
JWT's picture

I wouldn't claim to be an expert, but so far as I understand it:

Kan = Hall

Kai = Association

Ryu = School

ky0han
ky0han's picture

Hi Tau,

Kan means "building". Take a look here http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E9%A4%A8

Kai means "organisation" or "club" Karatekai means Karate Club. Look here http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E6%9C%83 or here for the simplified kanji http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E4%BC%9A

Ryu means something along the lines of a "stream" or "school" like in different kind of art forms (impressionism, expressionism, etc.). Look here http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E6%B5%81

Hope that helps.

Regards Holger

Tau
Tau's picture

Thanks chaps.

Black Tiger
Black Tiger's picture

You do get exception

I've seen "kaikan", "RyuDo" and others in the mix

I think the worst is another organisation which can be translated as "rape" school. Another I've seen is "Geri Karate" which can be "SICK" karate.

I originally called my school Kuri Tora Ryu but changed it to Koku Tora Ryu, and now its Just Black Tiger Karate.

I don't think it matters that much these days, most students aren't really interested in learning Japanese, Korean or Chinese these days

Tau
Tau's picture

Black Tiger wrote:
I think the worst is another organisation which can be translated as "rape" school.

Yes, I think we know who that is. An organisation that doesn't enjoy the best of reputations anyway.

 

Black Tiger wrote:
Another I've seen is "Geri Karate" which can be "SICK" karate.

I thought "geri" was diahorea?

 

Black Tiger wrote:
I don't think it matters that much these days, most students aren't really interested in learning Japanese, Korean or Chinese these days

I think it does. Lots of people, me included, put effort into finding a name that describes the philosophy behind the school or the primary concept. When I learned what "Ju" meant and Jujitsu ceased being the "gentle art" my mind was opened to how the art is supposed to work. 

ky0han
ky0han's picture

Hi,

Tau wrote:
I thought "geri" was diahorea?
Tau you are absolutely right. Look at the google translator here. What should Kajuen mean? When I ask my word processor for an item it shows me that kajuen means "orchard", so I figure that those three(?) kanji you chose are forming not only one word but have their own meaning. Regards Holger

Stevenson
Stevenson's picture

Quote:
I think the worst is another organisation which can be translated as "rape" school.

Well, I have heard that about said organization, and I know which one you mean, but actually I have never seen any corroboration for that rumour/idea. Which language is that supposed to be translated from? From Japanese it's nothing like 'rape', and there are 4 major Okinawan dialects, each incomprehensible to each other, and I have never encountered anyone who new any Okinawan who recognized that translation. I'm beginning to think it's an old wives tale....

It'd be pretty funny if it was true.

Black Tiger
Black Tiger's picture

fair play to everyone regards the translations, from the sources I used it was translated as such as I wrote.

Regards the names in Foreign languages, I've found I've been more successful since I changed the name to English than when it was Japanese. 

I also found it hard with the syllabus, English/Japanese translations for techiques and Kata names. I have a feeling it will increase from there and maybe Black Tiger Karate will become Black Tiger Street Boxing and the kata etc will take their English Names.

Tau
Tau's picture

ky0han wrote:
When I ask my word processor for an item it shows me that kajuen means "orchard", so I figure that those three(?) kanji you chose are forming not only one word but have their own meaning.

You don't know how pleased I am that that's the translation that you've found.  I've done something right